Nostalgia for Letters

carol's letter less copyIn the back of an upstairs closet, under a layer of dust and some old clothes, I uncovered a box I hadn’t seen in years. Inside were some stray photographs from my college days and a few outdated documents. What caught my eye, though, were some letters a dear friend had sent to me. Holding them in my hands brought a flood of memories. I’d been away at school when I got them, on the precipice of the big unknown that was my future.

All these years later, I opened one to a date in the right hand corner: 10-3-79. My friend and I, born in 1960, would have been sophomores in college and 19—19! Continue reading

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Letters from Mother

Baby crawling at the end of a dark hallway.

When I was a young mother, chopping vegetables for dinner, I had this vision of the knife slipping, then suddenly ricocheting into my son as he crawled across the floor.

What was that? And how could I have pictured such a thing?

Sometime later, I learned that it Continue reading

The God of Sno Cone Blue (Prologue)

I saw the face of God once, in the summer clouds over my backyard fence. One minute it was water vapor and the next: My God, It’s God! That’s what I thought, anyway. I was a kid all those years ago and the preacher’s daughter, so naturally impressionable. And who hasn’t seen shapes in the clouds? Elephant, crocodile, Alfred Hitchcock’s puffy profile. Why not throw God in there too? But it didn’t seem like that, like some childish fantasy.

The minute before I was running home over the grass, hop-scotching dandelions that flashed under my feet. Halfway there, I changed my mind about going inside. It was the sky, the way it invited me to take a running leap and soar up past the power lines. I did the next best thing and flopped to the grass instead, sniffing a chest full of its weedy perfume. The sky was blue as a carnival sno cone, with choppy clouds like shaved ice, except for one that poured all silvery and strange, like the jar of mercury my teacher once brought to school. Continue reading